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Scientists Define New term For
Zombie Virus: 'CDHD'

(ZWN) 01/01/15
Special thanks to Sarah Griffiths. Daily Mail.

 

• Neuroscientists from Carnegie Mellon University, Pennsylvania, and the University of California, San Diego, analysed the behaviour of necro mortosis sufferers.

• They worked out which sections of the brain are damaged to trigger zombie behaviours, such as a lack of coordination and thirst for blood

• Scientists now have a new term for the condition, dubbed 'CDHD' or 'Conscious Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder'

• Damage to fusifrom gyrus explains zombies' inability to recognise faces

• Inability to suppress inappropriate responses, such as the desire to eat people is due to damage in the orbitofrontal cortex, they said




Zombie scientist Timothy Verstynen, an assistant professor in the department of psychology at Carnegie Mellon University in in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Bradley Voytek, assistant professor of cognitive science and neuroscience at the University of California, San Diego, summarised characteristic zombie behaviour seen since the global pandemic first began. This can be explained by looking at the structure of the brain

They have dubbed the condition 'Conscious Deficit Hypoactivity Disorder', or CDHD, which they describe as an acquired syndrome in which those who are infected by necro mortosis lack control over their actions. The undead display symptoms such as lethargic movement, loss of pleasure, language dysfunction, amnesia and the inability to suppress hunger and aggression.

‘Zombies often have difficulty recognising familiar people and suffer chronic insomnia that results in a delirious state,’ they write. Undead individuals also exhibit antisocial behaviour, such as biting and eating people, but they swarm with other infected individuals, according to the scientist.

At the moment of death, our circulatory systems stop, starving the brain of oxygen and glucose. The longer the brain is starved of oxygen, the more extensive the damage to zombies, the neuroscientists say.

Specifically, damage to the fusiform gyrus impairs the undead’s ability to recognise faces, while damage to the superior temporal gyrus hampers their ability to process emotional facial expressions, resulting in apathy to the feelings of others.

Professors Verstynen and Voytek say lesions in the temporal parietal junction - an area of the brain where the temporal and parietal lobes meet - result in severe difficulties in understanding language and in speaking; making communication difficult and causing slurring.

Meanwhile, damage to the medial temporal lobe – especially the hippocampus, which is responsible for memory and navigation - means that zombies couldn't form new memories and would find it hard to find their way around unfamiliar surroundings, giving humans a change of surviving an encounter.

Necrotics are known for their poor eyesight and visual impairment comes from damage to the parietal lobe. It perhaps explains why CDHD zombies can only look straight ahead and see one object at a time. Problems with spatial attention as a result of this injury, would also make general motor skills difficult.


The inability to suppress inappropriate responses, such as the desire to eat people is due to damage in the orbitofrontal cortex, while damage to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex makes decision making difficult.


Lesions to the interior frontal cortex, especially Broca’s area,which is linked to speech production, result in communication difficulties.

Damage to the cingulate cortex would mean that individuals may feel conflicted about emotional attachment to people and eating them, but they are still not be able to suppress the desire to eat.

The cerebellum, a region of the brain that plays an important role in motor control, would likely degenerate in CDHD zombies, explaining their severe coordination difficulties.

‘Individuals exhibit a wide stance and lumbering gait as well as difficulties reaching and grasping,’ professors Verstynen and Voytek write. Damage to this area of the brain would also lead to slurred speech.

A reanimates’ insomnia could be explained by lesions in the hypothalamus, which links the nervous system to the endocrine system.

In the mid-brain, lesions to the amygdalae - two almond-shaped groups of nuclei located deep within the temporal lobes of the brain - may explain enhanced fight or flight behaviours in the mortosis afflicted, expressed as impulsive aggression.

However, primary sensory areas of the brain that allow humans to process sights, sound, smell, touch and taste signals remain intact, meaning that zombies could use all sensory information, but wouldn't respond emotionally to it.

Some areas of the brain allowing basic movement, such as the thalamus - which is used to process neural signals - and the brainstem, function as usual upon infection, the neuroscientists explain.

‘In conclusion, the series of brain changes seen in CDHD, reflect a loss in so-called “higher order” cognition areas and the neocortex the CDHD subtype also reflects a degeneration of the cerebellum,’ they say.



President Obama announced the awarding of $5 billion in grants for research into cures ranging from necro-mortosis, cancer, heart diseases, and autism among other diseases.


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The World Health Authority site is the official Necro-Mortosis education site:
Visit it here for essential information on the virus.

Highlights of the recently released WHA report.

Upon infection, the exposed usually succumbs to reanimation within 4 - 48 hours. First stage symptoms feel like flu. Migraine, hot flushes, aching muscles.

Second stage is followed by severe chills, extreme lethargy, some disorientation, a gradual slowing of the heart rate. early onset dementia, extreme pain in their joints and muscle cramping. At this point, many fall into coma or suffer stroke or heart failure. This is due to the massive shock to the bodies immune system. Necrosis and mortification follow shortly afterwards.

Reanimation can occur within minutes. Studied subjects have nearly always reanimated within the first hour of death.

Source: World health Authority report



Baby Born With Necro-Mortosis Cured By Drug Combination
ZWN (AP) - Posted March 15/2014

Child born from necro-mortosis infected woman is cured using combination drug

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Necro-Mortosis (corpse/dead), also known by the names Mortuus Ambulare" (walking dead) and "Corpus Vigere" (active/awake corpse)

We do know that the 'Necro-Virus' (Necro Mortosis) was first discovered in the West Indies - Haiti in 2006

The cause of the virus remains unknown at this point.

Three predominant theories suggest it's origin

A: Voodoo (Vodou). Considering the source of the outbreak is Haiti, this first theory is expected. However, no scientific facts support this theory or give it any credibility.

B: Viral anomalistic. Possibly a hybrid or chimera virus. Possibly crossed species. If this is the case, It remains unclear how the virus originated or mutated.

C: A bi-product of chemical/bacterial warfare. This again seems unlikely. No country or credible terrorist organization has claimed responsibility for the virus at this time.

Read the full explanation of the virus HERE



 


Index of Other Major Non-Related Diseases & Conditions

ADHD
Arthritis
Asthma & Allergies
Autism
Avian Influenza
Birth Defects
Cancer
Chlamydia
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Diabetes
E. coli
Epilepsy
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
Flu (Influenza)
Genital Herpes (Herpes Simplex Virus)
Giardiasis
Gonorrhea
Heart Disease
Hepatitis
HIV/AIDS
HPV (Human papillomavirus)
Necro-Mortosis
Meningitis
Norovirus Infection
Obesity
Salmonella
Scabies
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Stroke
Trichomonas Infection (Trichomoniasis)
Tuberculosis (TB)

Main Content Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention







Facts about necro-mortosis

Mortosis is transferable through the exchange of blood, saliva orother bodily fluids, including bites.Mortosis can be contracted through sharing of needles. Virus can be sexually transmitted

There is no known antidote at this point (Beware internet scams claiming to sell cures or inhibitors)

Mortosis is NOT airborne

Only infected people will reanimate upon death.

None infected people or people who die of natural causes do NOT rise.

If bitten, (or otherwise infected) on an arm or leg, severing the affected appendage may remove the infection, but only within the first few minutes of exposure. Burning the affected wound will only act to cortorize the wound. Not remove the infection.

Animals exposed to the Necro-Mortosis virus will become sick and die but do not reanimate. Livestock exposed must be destroyed.

Upon infection, the exposed usually succumbs to reanimation within 4 - 48 hours. First stage symptoms feel like flu. Migraine, hot flushes, aching muscles.

Second stage is followed by severe chills, extreme lethargy, some disorientation, a gradual slowing of the heart rate. early onset dementia, extreme pain in their joints and muscle cramping. At this point, many fall into coma or suffer stroke or heart failure. This is due to the massive shock to the bodies immune system. Necrosis and mortification follow shortly afterwards.

Reanimation can occur within minutes. Studied subjects have nearly always reanimated within the first hour of death.

Source: World health Authority report

 


The different levels of a mortosis outbreak:

Mortosis outbreaks can be separated into three categories, depending on how easily they can can spread and the severity of death they cause. Category A outbreaks are considered the highest risk and Category C outbreaks are those that are considered emerging threats or easily containable.


Category Level 'A'

These high-priority outbreaks pose the highest risk to the public and national security because: They can be easily spread or transmitted from person to person
They result in high death rates and have the potential for major public health impact
They might cause public panic and social disruption
They require special action for public health preparedness.


Category Level 'B'
These outbreaks are the second highest priority because:
They are moderately easy to spread
They result in a moderate rate of death and/or low death rates
They require specific enhancements of Center for Disease Control's laboratory capacity and enhanced disease monitoring.

Category Level 'C'
These third highest priority outbreaks include emerging threats that could be spread in the future because:
They are easily transferable
They have potential for high morbidity and mortality rates and major health impact.
Source: CDC - Center for Disease Control and Prevention

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